Preanesthetic Testing

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Preanesthetic Blood Testing and Your Dog

What is preanesthetic blood testing?

While the name may sound complicated, preanesthetic testing just means checking certain values in your dog’s blood work before any anesthesia is given or surgery is performed. Running these tests can help identify common issues that may require a change to how anesthesia is given to your pet.

How will preanesthetic blood testing protect my dog?

Certain medical conditions can create complications for dogs under anesthesia so your veterinarian will likely recommend some basic blood tests prior to the anesthetic event. These blood tests will help reveal potential conditions and determine if your dog’s vital organs are functioning properly, helping your veterinarian create an individualized anesthetic plan for your dog.

Even if preanesthetic testing doesn’t reveal any issues, it establishes baseline results for your dog, which are helpful for future reference in your dog’s medical care.

What information could preanesthetic blood testing reveal?

  • Kidney tests, along with physical examination findings and a complete urinalysis, will help assess your dog’s hydration status and kidney function. Results may reveal that he has kidney disease and how bad it is.
  • Liver results can reveal problems in the liver, gallbladder and/or bile ducts. Potential causes include inflammation, toxin exposure and certain endocrine disorders. Additional tests may be indicated to determine the cause of the liver test abnormalities.
  • Electrolyte results can reveal evidence for Addison’s disease, acid-base imbalances and certain other medical problems.
  • A complete blood count (CBC) can reveal inflammation, inability to fight infection or leukemia, among other things. It may also indicate low platelets, which can result in bleeding tendencies or anemia.

See your veterinarian for a complete list of preanesthetic tests.

What can I do to prepare my dog for preanesthetic blood testing and surgery?

You should ask your veterinarian what steps to take before the big day. Your veterinarian may recommend that you make sure your dog has not eaten anything (fasted) for at least 12 hours before surgery. Remember to ask questions if you don’t understand what’s being done and why. Surgery can be complicated, so it’s important to know all you can about your dog’s health.

To learn more about preanesthetic testing and surgery visitpethealthnetwork.com/dog-health/dog-surgery-a-z/.

Preanesthetic Blood Testing and Your Cat

What is preanesthetic blood testing?

While the name may sound complicated, preanesthetic testing just means checking certain values in your cat’s blood work before any anesthesia is given or surgery is performed. Running these tests can help identify common issues that may require a change to how anesthesia is given to your pet.

How will preanesthetic blood testing protect my cat?

Certain medical conditions can create complications for cats under anesthesia so your veterinarian will likely recommend some basic blood tests prior to the anesthetic event. These blood tests will help reveal potential conditions and determine if your cat’s vital organs are functioning properly, helping your veterinarian create an individualized anesthetic plan for your cat.

Even if preanesthetic testing doesn’t reveal any issues, it establishes baseline results for your cat, which are helpful for future reference as your cat ages.

What information could preanesthetic blood testing reveal?

  • Kidney tests, along with physical examination findings and a complete urinalysis, will help assess your cat’s hydration status and kidney function. Results may reveal that he has kidney disease and how bad it is.
  • Liver results can reveal problems in the liver, gallbladder and/or bile ducts. Potential causes include inflammation, toxin exposure and certain endocrine disorders. Additional tests may be indicated to determine the cause of the liver test abnormalities.
  • Electrolyte results can reveal evidence for Addison’s disease, acid-base imbalances and certain other medical problems.
  • A complete blood count (CBC) can reveal inflammation, inability to fight infection or leukemia, among other things. It may also indicate low platelets, which can result in bleeding tendencies or anemia.
  • NTproBNP blood test assesses heart health. See your veterinarian for a complete list of preanesthetic tests.

What can I do to prepare my cat for preanesthetic blood testing and surgery?

You should ask your veterinarian what steps to take before the big day. Your veterinarian may recommend that you make sure your cat has not eaten anything (fasted) for at least 12 hours before surgery. Remember to ask questions if you don’t understand what’s being done and why. Surgery can be complicated, so it’s important to know all you can about your cat’s health.

To learn more about preanesthetic testing and surgery visitpethealthnetwork.com/cat-health/cat-surgery-a-z/.


Megan

Megan is a senior at Olathe East. She is on the dance team. She plans to attend K-State next year to major in animal science and plans to be a Veterinarian someday.


Anna

Anna has decided to devote her early 20’s to traveling. At the top of her list of travels is Tokyo, Japan. When she isn’t in Camp Hawthorne or assisting the kennel staff, you can find her: dog/cat sitting for other families, at home painting portraits or spending quality time with her friends, family, and two cats, Chloe and Celery.


Tessa

Tessa is our morning daycare attendant/kennel assistant where she enjoys gaining more hands on experience with animal behavior. Hoping to accomplish her dream of taking care of animals as a career, she is currently enrolled in the Penn Foster Veterinary Technician program. In her spare time she loves to be with her two dogs Nellie and Stella and her sweet kitty Henry.


Samantha

Samantha is a senior at Blue Valley North West High School and has a love for animals. She has two dogs, a dachshund and a boxer, and has wanted to work with animals since she was small. She started in the industry as a kennel attendant at another animal hospital. We are lucky to now have her here as a member of our team.